DOPI, ROPI, DEPO and REPO
     
 
to conventions this page was last updated: 10-July-2006
 
     
 
 
If you wish you can view the pdf file or download the Word Doc file for printing.
 
     
     
     
 

DOPI, ROPI, DEPO, REPO

 
  when your Blackwood/Gerber is interfered with.  
     
 

DOPI (Double 0 Pass 1) and ROPI

 
  It does not matter if you play 4 or 4NT to ask for aces (or key cards), if the opponents bid over your asking bid then obviously things change. I have witnessed this at the club when a lay-down 7NT (13 tricks off the top) was missed.  
     
  Let's assume you are playing simple Blackwood, you have 2 aces and partner bids 4NT to ask. Your response is 5, but what if your RHO sticks in a bid of 5 ? The answer is the DOPI convention: -  
     
 

Double

= 1st step (0 aces)
Pass = 2nd step (1 ace)
Next bid (so 5 here) = 3rd step (2 aces)
Next but 1 bid (so 5 here) = 4th step (3 aces)
 
  etc...  
     
  The same principle applies if you play RKCB, Gerber or whatever. Note that the lower responses (double or pass) allow for a possibility of defending against a doubled contract by opponents. Often a good idea if you are short of aces/key cards!  
     
  If RHO doubles the asking bid, then there is a similar convention (ROPI)  
     
 

Redouble

= 1st step (0 aces)
Pass = 2nd step (1 ace)
Next bid (so 5 here) = 3rd step (2 aces)
Next but 1 bid (so 5 here) = 4th step (3 aces)
 
  etc...  
     
  Now I have been careful to mention steps here. For example, If you play standard RKCB then  
  1 st step = 0 or 3 key cards, 2 nd step = 1 or 4 key cards etc.  
  (the other way round if you play 1430).  
     
     
 

DEPO (Double Even Pass Odd) and REPO

 
  This is a less popular variation of the above but has the advantage that the opponent's can always be doubled for penalties.  
     
  So when your Blackwood bid is overcalled it's REPO: -  
     
 

Double

= Even (0, 2 or 4 aces)
Pass = Odd (1 or 3 aces)
 
     
  And if your Blackwood bid is doubled: -  
     
 

Redouble

= Even (0, 2 or 4 aces)
Pass = Odd (1 or 3 aces)
 
     
  You have to decide if you prefer D(R)OPI or D(R)EPO. I actually know of one pair that play  
  D(R)OPI at the four level and D(R)EPO at the five level. I guess that that makes sense you are more likely to want to penalise the opponents at the five level.  
     
     
 
  Pattaya Bridge Club - www.pattayabridge.com
 
     
 
to conventions